Considerations for Persons With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury The intensified use of explosive devices and mines in warfare and excessive noise of weapons has created an extraordinary amount of auditory dysfunction, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and mental health complaints among soldiers from the global war on terrorism. Mild TBI, particularly for those with closed head injuries, may not ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2008
Considerations for Persons With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paula J. Myers
    James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital/Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center, Tampa, FL
  • James A. Henry
    VA RR&D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR
    Department of Otolaryngology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Tara L. Zaugg
    VA RR&D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2008
Considerations for Persons With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
Perspectives on Audiology, August 2008, Vol. 4, 21-34. doi:10.1044/poa4.1.21
Perspectives on Audiology, August 2008, Vol. 4, 21-34. doi:10.1044/poa4.1.21
Abstract

The intensified use of explosive devices and mines in warfare and excessive noise of weapons has created an extraordinary amount of auditory dysfunction, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and mental health complaints among soldiers from the global war on terrorism. Mild TBI, particularly for those with closed head injuries, may not be immediately obvious. Audiologists must be prepared to identify those at risk for mild TBI or mental health problems, justify the need for screening and/or clinical referral for further evaluation of TBI and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and adapt audiologic clinical assessment and management practices to this population. An interdisciplinary comprehensive evaluation of peripheral, central, and vestibular components of the auditory system should be employed in patients with mild TBI to ensure that auditory dysfunction is accurately diagnosed so appropriate rehabilitation can be provided.

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