Can Behavioral Speech-In-Noise Tests Improve the Quality of Hearing Aid Fittings? The purpose of this article is to propose 4 dimensions for consideration in hearing aid fittings and 4 tests to evaluate those dimensions. The 4 dimensions and tests are (a) working memory, evaluated by the Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (Bilger, Nuetzel, & Rabinowitz, 1984); (b) performance in noise, ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2011
Can Behavioral Speech-In-Noise Tests Improve the Quality of Hearing Aid Fittings?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Gordon-Hickey
    University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL
  • Robert Moore is an associate professor in and chair in of the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of South Alabama. BesidesIn addition to his academic and research experience, he has over more than 25 years of experience in clinical audiology. He received his graduate training at the University of Tennessee-, Knoxville. His research interests include acceptable noise levels, the effects of noise and reverberation on communication, and pitch discrimination and pitch matching abilities of musically trained and untrained individuals. He currently serves as Coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Group 6.
    Robert Moore is an associate professor in and chair in of the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of South Alabama. BesidesIn addition to his academic and research experience, he has over more than 25 years of experience in clinical audiology. He received his graduate training at the University of Tennessee-, Knoxville. His research interests include acceptable noise levels, the effects of noise and reverberation on communication, and pitch discrimination and pitch matching abilities of musically trained and untrained individuals. He currently serves as Coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Group 6.×
  • Susan Gordon-Hickey is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of South Alabama. Her research interests include the impact of background noise on communication, tinnitus, and auditory scene analysis. Her goal is to help improve hearing aid success rates.
    Susan Gordon-Hickey is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of South Alabama. Her research interests include the impact of background noise on communication, tinnitus, and auditory scene analysis. Her goal is to help improve hearing aid success rates.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2011
Can Behavioral Speech-In-Noise Tests Improve the Quality of Hearing Aid Fittings?
Perspectives on Audiology, November 2011, Vol. 7, 8-14. doi:10.1044/poa7.1.8
Perspectives on Audiology, November 2011, Vol. 7, 8-14. doi:10.1044/poa7.1.8

The purpose of this article is to propose 4 dimensions for consideration in hearing aid fittings and 4 tests to evaluate those dimensions. The 4 dimensions and tests are (a) working memory, evaluated by the Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (Bilger, Nuetzel, & Rabinowitz, 1984); (b) performance in noise, evaluated by the Quick Speech in Noise test (QSIN; Killion, Niquette, Gudmundsen, Revit, & Banerjee, 2004); (c) acceptance of noise, evaluated by the Acceptable Noise Level test (ANL; Nabelek, Tucker, & Letowski, 1991); and (d) performance versus perception, evaluated by the Perceptual–Performance test (PPT; Saunders & Cienkowski, 2002). The authors discuss the 4 dimensions and tests in the context of improving the quality of hearing aid fittings.

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