Quality 101: What Every Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathologist Should Know But Is Afraid to Ask The United States has the highest per capita health care costs of any industrialized nation in the world. Increasing costs are reducing access to care and constitute an increasingly heavy burden on employers and consumers. Yet as much as 20 to 30 percent of these costs may be unnecessary, or ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2011
Quality 101: What Every Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathologist Should Know But Is Afraid to Ask
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tamala S. Bradham
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN
  • Tamala S. Bradham is an assistant professor and Associate Director of Quality, Protocols, and Risk Management in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center in Nashville, TN. She is the coordinator of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s Special Interest Group 9: Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood and the former director of the Medical University of South Carolina Cochlear Implant Center in Charleston. She also is past president of both the South Carolina Academy of Audiology and the South Carolina chapter of the Alexander Graham Bell Association and has served as the vice chairperson of the First Sound Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program in South Carolina. Bradham received her master’s degree in audiology in 1994 and her doctorate in speech and hearing sciences at the University of South Carolina in 1998. Her major academic, clinical, and research interests relate to cochlear implants, early intervention, and (re)habilitation. Bradham is the recipient of several awards for her clinical and state contributions, including the Gene Bratt Award, from the Tennessee Academy of Audiology; the Elizabeth Wade Memorial Award, from the South Carolina Academy of Audiology; the Successful Intervention Model—Audiology Award, from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; and the 1998 Maternal and Child Health Special Recognition Award, from the South Carolina Maternal and Child Health Board.
    Tamala S. Bradham is an assistant professor and Associate Director of Quality, Protocols, and Risk Management in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center in Nashville, TN. She is the coordinator of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s Special Interest Group 9: Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood and the former director of the Medical University of South Carolina Cochlear Implant Center in Charleston. She also is past president of both the South Carolina Academy of Audiology and the South Carolina chapter of the Alexander Graham Bell Association and has served as the vice chairperson of the First Sound Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program in South Carolina. Bradham received her master’s degree in audiology in 1994 and her doctorate in speech and hearing sciences at the University of South Carolina in 1998. Her major academic, clinical, and research interests relate to cochlear implants, early intervention, and (re)habilitation. Bradham is the recipient of several awards for her clinical and state contributions, including the Gene Bratt Award, from the Tennessee Academy of Audiology; the Elizabeth Wade Memorial Award, from the South Carolina Academy of Audiology; the Successful Intervention Model—Audiology Award, from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; and the 1998 Maternal and Child Health Special Recognition Award, from the South Carolina Maternal and Child Health Board.×
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Practice Management / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / International & Global / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2011
Quality 101: What Every Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathologist Should Know But Is Afraid to Ask
Perspectives on Audiology, November 2011, Vol. 7, 4-7. doi:10.1044/poa7.1.4
Perspectives on Audiology, November 2011, Vol. 7, 4-7. doi:10.1044/poa7.1.4

The United States has the highest per capita health care costs of any industrialized nation in the world. Increasing costs are reducing access to care and constitute an increasingly heavy burden on employers and consumers. Yet as much as 20 to 30 percent of these costs may be unnecessary, or even counterproductive, to improved health (Wennberg, Brownless, Fisher, Skinner, & Weinstein, 2008). Addressing these unwanted costs is essential in the survival of providing quality health care. This article reviews 11 dimensions that should be considered when starting a quality improvement program as well as one quality improvement tool, the Juran model, that is commonly used in the healthcare and business settings. Implementing a quality management program is essential for survival in today’s market place and is no longer an option. While it takes time to implement a quality management program, the costs are too high not to.

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