Keeping Pace With the Genetics Revolution In 2001, Collins and McKusick  wrote, “Asked whether genetics was a part of their everyday practice, most primary care physicians would say no. That is all about to change” (p. 540). That same revolution is occurring in the practice of audiology. We are faced with the need to keep ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2005
Keeping Pace With the Genetics Revolution
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill L. Elfenbein
    Audiology and Speech Sciences Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2005
Keeping Pace With the Genetics Revolution
Perspectives on Audiology, May 2005, Vol. 1, 3-5. doi:10.1044/poa1.1.3
Perspectives on Audiology, May 2005, Vol. 1, 3-5. doi:10.1044/poa1.1.3
In 2001, Collins and McKusick  wrote, “Asked whether genetics was a part of their everyday practice, most primary care physicians would say no. That is all about to change” (p. 540). That same revolution is occurring in the practice of audiology.
We are faced with the need to keep pace with a rapidly expanding knowledge base that often pushes the limits of our understanding of human biology and challenges us to learn a new set of jargon. Familiar words such as “amplification” take on new meanings (i.e., “the production of multiple copies of a DNA sequence”; Gelehrter, Collins, & Ginsburg, 1998, p. 341). New terms like SNP (a reference to a single nucleotide polymorphism that is pronounced “snip”) creep into our vocabularies from newspapers, our professional journals, and television. We even know enough to wonder why the laboratories in the “CSI” television programs are always so dimly lit when our genetics colleagues seem to prefer bright lab spaces.
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