Low Frequency Hearing Loss and Genetic Modifiers in an American Family Inherited deafness is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Large families segregating monogenic hearing loss provide an opportunity to dissect this genetic complexity. Large pedigrees with nonsyndromic hearing impairment have allowed genetic mapping of at least 80 chromosomal locations harboring auditory-related deafness (DFN) loci with the identification of over 30 DFN ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2005
Low Frequency Hearing Loss and Genetic Modifiers in an American Family
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Valerie Street
    Bloedel Hearing Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2005
Low Frequency Hearing Loss and Genetic Modifiers in an American Family
Perspectives on Audiology, May 2005, Vol. 1, 14-18. doi:10.1044/poa1.1.14
Perspectives on Audiology, May 2005, Vol. 1, 14-18. doi:10.1044/poa1.1.14
Inherited deafness is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Large families segregating monogenic hearing loss provide an opportunity to dissect this genetic complexity. Large pedigrees with nonsyndromic hearing impairment have allowed genetic mapping of at least 80 chromosomal locations harboring auditory-related deafness (DFN) loci with the identification of over 30 DFN genes (Van Camp & Smith, 2004). The DFN inheritance pattern is designated by A (dominant), B (recessive), and M (modifier), with a number following A, B, or M indicating the relative order in which the locus was identified. For example, DFNA1 represents the first dominantly inherited deafness locus mapped in humans. Loci on the X-chromosome are designated as DFN followed with a number, for example, DFN1, DFN2, and DFN3.
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